student support

Mature Students

We are committed to supporting all of our students of all ages, whether they are school leavers or career changers.

Who is a mature student?

If you are over 21 and studying for an undergraduate course or over 25 and studying for a postgraduate course you count as a mature student.

Applying as a mature student

The University of Law welcomes mature students, offering a variety of different study modes: full-time, part-time, attendance and online. Around 15% of our full-time undergraduate population are mature students. We have campuses across the country as well as online courses so you do not need to move away from home to be able to study with us. We have a large number of mature students on our online courses as they find this mode of study more suited to balancing their studies with their other commitments: over half of our online undergraduate students are mature.

We welcome mature applicants with all qualifications and consider applications holistically, taking into account professional and life experience. For more information please contact our Admissions team.

We offer individual campus tours at all of our campuses so you can visit at a time that suits you and can tailor your visit to your requirements. Please contact Student Information at your chosen campus to arrange this.

Support we offer for our mature students

  • 1-1 appointments with the Welfare Service. Our welfare officers can provide advice and guidance on concerns particular to mature students such as managing multiple commitments like study, work and family life.
  • Tailored advice from our Employability Service to your specific circumstances
  • Access to our confidential counselling service

"My concerns about my age were instantly dispelled. Several of my classmates on the weekend course were older than I am (in their forties and fifties) and came from various careers and backgrounds. All of the class, but particularly the mature students, supported each other throughout the course. The excellent tutors, some of whom had undertaken career changes themselves, were empathetic and helpful. The Employability Service was encouraging, too, giving examples of other mature students who had made a similar career change to the one I was undertaking."