• Guildford students crowned as University of Law national mooting champions

    14 May 2013


    Two Guildford law students demonstrated their ability to argue compellingly by becoming The University of Law’s national mooting champions for 2013 following a hotly contested final at The Royal Courts of Justice in London.

    Joshua Pugsley and Andrew Bailey, who are studying at the Guildford centre, battled against teams from six other nationwide University of Law centres in the knockout rounds, which were held in the Mayor and City of London Court and heard by Gerald Gouriet QC.

    They then triumphed against a team from the Manchester centre in the grand final held at The Royal Courts of Justice before Lord Justice Moses.

    Guildford law students Joshua Pugsley (left) and Andrew Bailey celebrate being crowned winners of The University of Law National Mooting Competition 2013 outside The Royal Courts of Justice.

    Guildford law students Joshua Pugsley (left) and Andrew Bailey celebrate being crowned winners of The University of Law National Mooting Competition 2013 outside The Royal Courts of Justice.

    Mooting tests the advocacy skills of students, who argue a fictitious case and demonstrate use of case law during simulated court proceedings. It demands the ability to think quickly and argue compellingly, and the winner is decided on the merits of how they present their case and apply the law to the particular set of circumstances.

    The case heard during the competition was based on the Alcock v Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police case from 1992, which looked to establish liability for nervous shock as a result of the 1989 Hillsborough disaster.

    Helen Carter, Senior Tutor at The University of Law in Guildford, said: “The quality of presentation and legal argument in the knockout rounds was outstanding and the battle for places in the final was fierce. Joshua and Andrew were praised by Lord Justice Moses for commanding the court and sticking robustly to their argument.

    “Mooting is an activity commonly carried out by law students and is an important way for future lawyers to develop their advocacy skills in a realistic environment.”

    Joshua is studying the Graduate Diploma in Law, which gives non-law graduates an entry route into the legal profession, while Andrew is undertaking the Legal Practice Course, the next stage of training for aspiring solicitors.

    Joshua said: “Taking part in the final rounds of The University of Law's national mooting competition was a highly demanding and rewarding experience for me.  My skills were thoroughly tested by Mr Gouriet QC and Lord Justice Moses and I gained a practical insight into the standard of advocacy expected of barristers in the courts.  Winning the competition has confirmed my interest in pursuing the challenging career path of an advocate and I now intend to go on to study the Bar Professional Training Course with The University of Law.” 

    Andrew added: “The competition was certainly a demanding experience and the calibre of the opposition was, as to be expected, very high. It felt fantastic to win and taking part has left me with valuable experience that I can take with me to my future career.”



    Further information:

    Lucy Wray, Public Relations Manager, The University of Law on 01483 216072 (lucy.wray@law.ac.uk)