• Birmingham Science Graduate Wins Award After Turning Her Talents To Law

    2 June 2010


    A multi-talented student from Birmingham, who has a degree in Biochemistry and speaks Japanese, has now also proved her prowess in the legal arena by winning an award from the Birmingham Law Society.

    Rebecca Mulvany, aged 23, has been presented with the Peter Nicholls Prize for her performance on the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course at The College of Law in Birmingham.

    Birmingham student Rebecca Mulvany is presented with her award by outgoing president of the Birmingham Law Society, Bernard Shepherd.

    Birmingham student Rebecca Mulvany is presented with her award by outgoing president of the Birmingham Law Society, Bernard Shepherd.
     
    The prize was in recognition of her achieving the best marks in her year for the Equity and Law of Trusts unit of the exam.

    Rebecca grew up in Birmingham where she attended Sutton Coldfield Grammar School for Girls. She went on to study Biochemistry at the University of Bristol and graduated with a 2:1 class honours degree.

    She then turned her attention to the law profession and completed her GDL at The College of Law last year and is currently studying the Legal Practice Course (LPC), which all those intending to become solicitors must pass before going on to the next stage of practice.

    She said: “Coming from a science background I found the GDL and LPC new and challenging and thoroughly enjoyed them. I think that Biochemistry gave me good logical and methodical skills, although it was challenging having to develop reasoned and concise legal arguments rather than discussing scientific research.

    “I was delighted when I found out that I had won the Birmingham Law Society award. I felt that it was a great achievement to attain the highest mark in my year.”

    Rebecca has secured a training contract at the Birmingham office of international law firm DLA Piper and hopes to use her science knowledge plus her Japanese language skills to develop her career.

    “I am improving my Japanese and hope that, combined with my Biochemistry degree, it will allow me to gain experience in Life Sciences, advising Japanese biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies,” she said. “At university drug targets and drug design and development were particular interests and I hope that my knowledge of the field will help me to better understand these clients’ businesses.”
      

    Further information

    Contact Lucy Wray, Press Officer, The College of Law on 01483 216072 (lucy.wray@lawcol.co.uk).